Journal of American History

Announcements

Awards

Kristen Hoganson’s article “Meat in the Middle: Converging Borderlands in the U.S. Midwest, 1865—1900” in the March 2012 issue of the JAH has won the 2012 Wayne D. Rasmussen Award from the Agricultural History Society for the best article on agricultural history not published in Agricultural History.

Paul Chastko’s article “Anonymity and Ambivalence: The Canadian and American Oil Industries and the Emergence of Continental Oil” in the June 2012 issue of the JAH has won the Article of the Year Award from the Petroleum History Society.

The Binkley-Stephenson Award for the best scholarly article published in the JAH during the preceding calendar year was presented to Matthew Avery Sutton, “Was FDR the Antichrist? The Birth of Fundementalist Antiliberalism in a Global Age,” which appeared in March 2012.

The Louis Pelzer Memorial Award for the best essay in American history submitted by a graduate student was given to Cameron B. Strang of the University of Texas for his essay, “Violence, Ethnicity, and Human Remains during the Second Seminole War.” It will appear in a future issue of the JAH.

The Louis Pelzer Memorial Award Committee invites candidates for graduate degrees to submit essays for the Louis Pelzer Memorial Award competition. Essays may deal with any period or topic in the history of the United States. The winning essay will be published in the JAH. In addition, the OAH presents $500 to the winner. The deadline for entries for the 2013 competition is November 29, 2013.

For submission guidelines, see the OAH Web site. Manuscripts should be addressed to Pelzer Award Chair, Journal of American History, 1215 East Atwater Ave., Bloomington, Indiana 47401—3703, USA.

The Organization of American Historians gives the David Thelen Award biennially to the best article on American history that has been published in a language other than English. The winning article will be published in translation in the JAH. The deadline for entries published during 2013 and 2014 is May 1, 2015.

For submission guidelines, see the OAH Web site. Please submit five copies of the entry, along with a one- or two-page essay in English explaining why the article is a significant and original contribution to our understanding of American history, to Thelen Award Chair, Journal of American History, 1215 East Atwater Ave., Bloomington, Indiana 47401—3703, USA.

Corrections

The first sentence of the second paragraph of the review of The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 36: 1 December 1801 to 3 March 1802 in the December 2012 JAH (pp. 897–98) should read: “We now have before us the most recent fruit of these long labors, volume 36 of The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, which includes the end of the first year of his presidency.”

Also in that review, the first sentence of the third paragraph should read: “Among the more noteworthy and deservedly famous Jeffersonian missives included in this volume is his letter to the Danbury Baptist Association, both in its initial draft (on or before December 31, 1801 [pp. 254–55]) and final version (January 1, 1802 [p. 258]).”

In Sarah Miller-Davenport’s essay “‘Their blood shall not be shed in vain,’” in the March 2013 JAH, the first sentence of the final paragraph on page 1125 should read, “Anne Dievendorf, a missionary who had been in Japan for decades and was interned by the Japanese military along with other foreign missionaries during the war, linked Japanese emptiness and the opportunity for evangelism in a field letter in 1947.”

In that same issue, in Christine Woyshner, Andrea Reidell, and Marc Brasof’s essay “The Cultural Fieldwork Initiative,” the second sentence of the caption on page 1195 should read, “Courtesy J. Welles Henderson Archives and Library, Independence Seaport Museum.”

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